Newsletter Notes For Direct Sales Leaders (Part 1)

JasonC —  August 17, 2013 — 3 Comments

DSHHLogo

As a leader in a direct sales company, you’ve worked hard to build a team. The people who belong to your downline are incredibly valuable to you because they are the key to achieving big dreams with your direct sales business. That makes keeping your recruits (and their recruits!) engaged one of the most valuable things you can do as a direct sales leader (the other thing you can and should do is model for them a high-quality personal business that they can emulate and duplicate).

In order to keep your team engaged, it’s important to reach out to them in different ways. Build that relationship and be there for them. Consistently. One of the things that can be most demotivating for girls on your team is when they need you and you’re not there. It happens, and it has happened to Holley. But do everything you can to avoid this! Trust me!

Ways you can engage with your team:

  1. Personal calls, emails, texts.
  2. Team Facebook groups.
  3. Group calls and training.
  4. Team meetings (business and social!)
  5. Monthly newsletters.

This post is going to focus on tips for your team newsletter.

One of the reasons I’m writing about this is that this is a great area for a Direct Sales Husband to step in and help out. I do a lot for Holley’s newsletter. Maybe you can help your wife with hers. (And if not, hopefully this article will still help!)


In this day & age of instant gratification on Facebook, Twitter, and mobile texting, what is the point of a newsletter? 

The single main benefit of a team newsletter is group recognition. If you have a team of 30 girls selling Thirty-One Gifts products, it’s a source of pride for these girls to be mentioned in the newsletter to their peers. These girls may rarely if ever meet, but they can still be recognized for their positive achievements.

Let’s Talk About Recognition

1. Make a big deal about recognition.

This should be your primary focus for the newsletter. Think carefully about the achievements you want to recognize. This part of your newsletter needs to feature prominently, and if there is only one thing in your newsletter at all, recognition should be it.

2. Recognize new additions to your team.

All of your new recruits (since your last newsletter) as well as the recruits for whom you are their first level of leadership should be welcomed to your team somewhere prominently! 

3. Recognize the recruiters on your team.

Let the other girls on your team know who is recruiting. (I know, Duh! Still, it’s important)

4. Recognize great sellers.

This is an area that may change depending on where you are. If you are just starting out as a leader, you may want to recognize almost any level of party activity. In Thirty-One, it only takes $200 in sales every 3 months to remain active. That might be where you set your bar initially. But at some point you’d like for that behavior to be “automatic” and maybe choose to recognize only those consultants who have a minimum of $500 in sales. If you’re a high level leader, you may look even higher. Obviously, this may differ with different companies.

5. Put the actual numbers in the newsletter, order your recognition top to bottom.

Everyone likes to be #1 in a list. Some people are driven by that. Some have competitive streaks. If a consultant isn’t driven by competition, you will still be keeping her engaged in other manners (see above). But for those who have a competitive streak, this is a big deal. Most of those people will never admit it, either! But it’s there. And it may take slightly different forms. It may not be a “I’m driven to beat Jane in total sales this month.” It may be a “I’d like to be in the top 10 this month.” You’d be surprised how that internal motivation can take someone from being a 1 party a month consultant to 2. And then eventually to 4 or 6 parties a month. That’s a big deal.

6. Recognize top single parties.

If there’s a consultant on your team doing $1200 parties and she gets recognized, you can bet other girls on your team will reach out to her to find out how they can do that too!

7. Recognize promotions & other special achievements.

Any time a consultant makes the leap to the next level in your company’s leadership ladder, recognize her! This is an awesome thing! Also, there are other achievements you can recognize. For instance, if a girl earns an incentive set up by the company (Thirty-One’s Dream Rewards) or one you’ve set up for your team, definitely have a place for these in your newsletter.

 

One of my focuses for this year is to keep my posts SHORTER. Ugh, I’m already failing! Stay tuned for more newsletter tips soon.

How do you use your newsletter? Do you feel like it’s a useful tool for your team?

Technorati Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

  • Chris Cline

    Jason, do you use a template of somekind or a particular program? Would you mind sharing a sample of it? I’m not sure wear to start!

    • JasonEC

      Chris, I’m working on part 2 with some more specific tips right now.

  • http://sarahruthtoday.com/ Sarah Ruth

    This is so great! I haven’t promoted to Director yet (I’m so close!) But I have been thinking about starting a newsletter. This helps!